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Grant Writing

CLASSES

Intensive Grant Writing Class (9 session course)

The Intensive Grant Writing Class provides participants – who are new/junior faculty -- with the opportunity to learn how to write a competitive independent grant application in a small group, interactive setting.  Participants attend weekly class sessions, during which they learn how to develop the content of each component of an NIH R-level grant application (Specific Aims/Project Summary; Significance; Innovation; Approach; Preliminary Studies for New Applications.   Additional subjects include Environment; Biosketch, including personal statement; and the budget. 

Target audience: Junior faculty

PREV617 Grant Writing Course

The Grant Writing course is interactive, with a “peer-review structure”; as such, participants are required to write and submit specific sections of their grants for review by class participants.  In addition, participants are expected to review and critique their course-mates’ work. 

Target audience: Junior faculty

Grant Writing Class: Writing a Career Development (“K”) Award (9 session course)

The Grant Writing Class provides participants – who are new/junior faculty or senior postdocs -- with the opportunity to learn how to write a competitive career development award in a small group, interactive setting.  Participants attend weekly class sessions, during which they learn how to develop the content of each component of an NIH career development award, including the Candidate sections as well as the Research Plan.

Target audience: Junior faculty, postdoctoral fellows

K Boot Camp (5 session course)

The “K” Boot Camp is a small (up to 6 participants) writing group for junior faculty who intend to submit a career development (K) application. The group meets once a week to receive critical feedback on each major component of their K application.  Participants are expected to provide feedback to their colleagues.   The goal is to help participants develop the most competitive application possible prior to submission. Towards this goal, participants work together in a supportive environment, identifying aspects of the application that are clear and compelling as well as identifying areas about which they have questions/suggestions.

Target audience: Junior faculty

WORKSHOPS

Grant Writing Workshop for New Investigators (1 day workshop)

The Grant Writing Workshop for New Investigators is targeted to new/junior faculty who have not yet applied to the NIH or who are not familiar with the new NIH grant application. This one-day, examples-driven workshop is designed to help faculty understand how to plan, organize and write a competitive grant application, with a focus on the R01. The workshop is designed to help investigators understand how to write the components of the new NIH grant application (Specific Aims; Significance; Innovation; Approach, including Statistical Analysis) as well as Budget/Budget Justification   In addition, participants learn how to write their grants to address the new NIH review criteria, as well as learn about the NIH System of Peer Review.

Target audience: Junior faculty, senior postdoctoral fellows and clinical fellows

Tips for Writing an R03/R21 NIH Grant Application (1/2 day workshop)

The NIH offers two grant mechanisms to support the early stages of project development: the R03 (Small Research Grant) and the R21 (Exploratory Developmental Research Grant).  These two mechanisms, both of which support up to 2 years of research, are often useful as a stepping stone to an R01.  The basic difference between these mechanisms is that while the R03 supports small research projects that can be carried out in a short period of time with limited resources, the R21 supports exploratory, novel studies that are high risk, but which promise high reward.  This workshop focuses on how to write each of these grant mechanisms.

Target audience: Junior faculty

How to Write a Career Development (K) Award ½ day workshop)

The workshop is intended for new/junior faculty and senior postdocs interested in applying for a career development (K) award. This workshop covers the following subjects: an overview of career development awards, including how to identify the most appropriate mechanism; pointers for writing the Research Strategy (Aims, Significance, Innovation, Approach) as well as non-research parts of a K award (personal statement, career development plan, ethics training, etc.).

Target audience: Junior faculty, postdoctoral fellows and clinical fellows

FUNDING

Identifying Funding Sources for Postdocs (monthly)

This interactive workshop, given by Stacie Mendoza, Research Information Specialist, will assist postdocs in identifying non-NIH sources of funding for their research. Topics will include:

  • Comprehensive introduction to various funding resources, including searchable databases and useful websites
  • Interactive demonstration using funding databases
  • Helpful tips for identifying sources of funding

Identifying Funding Sources for Faculty (monthly)

This interactive workshop given by Stacie Mendoza, Research Information Specialist, will assist faculty in identifying non-NIH sources of funding for their research. Topics will include:

  • Comprehensive introduction to various funding resources, including searchable databases and useful websites
  • Interactive demonstration using funding databases
  • Helpful tips for identifying sources of funding

In order to increase awareness of non-NIH funding sources, the Office for Research Career Development hosts a bi-monthly seminar series for UMB researchers who would like to learn how to identify, apply and write a grant application for non-NIH sources of funding. Seminars include:

  • U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs
  • National Science Foundation (NSF)
  • Department of Defense
  • Corporate sponsors

More to come...