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Glaser Prize in Imaging

The Department has re-established The Glaser Prize in Imaging.

This prize was established to honor Dr. Edmund Glaser when he retired from the Department of Physiology in 1997. Dr. Glaser and his colleague, Dr. Hendrick Van der Loos, made a seminal contribution in the 1960’s by creating the first computer-assisted neuron reconstruction system - Neurolucida. He went on to found a company, MBF Bioscience, to further develop and market software for neuroscience imaging in 1988 with his son Jack Glaser, the current company president.

The prize is awarded for the most visually attractive scientific image submitted by a student working in the current academic year in the laboratory of a faculty member with a primary or secondary appointment in the Department of Physiology. Images may be obtained with any instrument, may be of any cell or tissue type, and may be subjected to any form of post-acquisition modification.

Peter Tuo Li, winner of the 2015 Glaser Prize in Imaging, explaining to Dr. Glaser his research.

Peter Tuo Li, winner of the 2015 Glaser Prize in Imaging, explaining to Dr. Glaser his research. The colored trajectories of this image depict the movement of individual GFP-tagged transmembrane proteins on the plasma membrane of a cultured rat hippocampal neuron (each filled circle indicates the first position of a trajectory). Together they delineate the morphology of a femtoliter-sized protrusion known as the dendritic spine, an important site of excitatory synaptic transmission.

Building this image utilized a single-molecule tracking method called uPAINT (Universal Point Accumulation Imaging in Nanoscale Topography). The GFP-tagged proteins were very sparsely labeled with dye-conjugated anti-GFP nanobodies. Images of individual dye molecules were acquired at 50 frames per second. The final image as shown was created by superimposing all of the trajectories collected over the course of 2 minutes. The dendritic spine is only about 1 μm long, highlighting the extraordinarily fine detail that this approach can reveal.

 
Dr. Glaser along with our current and former winners of the Dr. Edmund Glaser Award, and Dr. Scott Thompson, Chair of the Department of Physiology.

Dr. Glaser along with our current and former winners of the Dr. Edmund Glaser Award, and Dr. Scott Thompson, Chair of the Department of Physiology.