banner.jpg
Bookmark and Share

Surgical Centers & Medical Spas

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) requires that ambulatory surgical centers (ASCs) maintain infection control programs directed by a designated healthcare professional with training in infection control. In 2008, CMS inspected 68 ASCs, including 32 in Maryland, as part of a pilot test of their infection control audit tool and found that two-thirds of the ASCs were found to have at least one lapse in infection control. 58% of the ASCs were ultimately cited for deficiencies in infection control.  

CMS is now requiring all states to use the infection control audit tool.

EXAMPLE #1: SHUTDOWN OF A COSMETIC MEDICAL SPA

In September 2012, Monarch Med Spa, a cosmetic surgical center in Timonium, MD was shut down by the Maryland Department of Mental Health and Hygiene (DHMH) due to reports of three invasive infections of Group-A Streptococcus. A 59-year old woman died after contracting a bacterial infection following her liposuction procedure. Two other patients were hospitalized. All three had preventable infections. This story made local and national headlines.

In its September 19, 2012 Order to Cease Operations, DHMH cited numerous deviations from standard infection control practices and stated that

"...the conditions at the Monarch Med Spa facility...endanger the public health...and all operations at the facility should cease until the cause of the infections is investigated and the threat to public health has abated."

Basic infection control could have prevented this outbreak. Having an expert available when a problem starts, will prevent it from getting out of control.

Monarch Med Spa Outbreak report  

EXAMPLE #2: TECHNICIAN EXPOSES THOUSANDS OF PATIENTS TO HEPATITIS C

Between 2008 and 2012, 46 hospital patients developed acute hepatitis C infection. Traceback revealed a technician was diverting fentanyl and other medications and in the process exposed thousands of patients to hepatitis C over multiple states. Patient confidence is eroded and lawsuits ensue.

Maryland's DHMH report on transmission of the hepatitis C infection through unlawful drug diversion  

HAVE REVIEWS OF YOUR FACILITY TO EDUCATE STAFF AND UNDERSTAND HOW TO IMPROVE PATIENT SAFETY. WE PROVIDE ACCESS TO CONFIDENTIAL EXPERTISE WHEN CONCERNS ARISE.