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Tami J Kingsbury
 

Tami J Kingsbury Ph.D.

Academic Title: Assistant Professor
Primary Appointment: Physiology
tking001@umaryland.edu
Location: HSF-II, S111
Phone: (410) 706-7687
Fax: (410) 706-8341
Lab: (410) 706-7685

Personal History:

I received my Ph.D. from the Department of Biology at Johns Hopkins University.  I was trained as a yeast molecular biologist and geneticist. As a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Dr. Kyle Cunningham, I discovered a novel family of proteins conserved from yeast to humans that regulates the protein phosphatase calcineurin. One of the human homologs, DSCR1, is located on Chromosome 21, the chromosome triplicated in Down Syndrome patients. I therefore decided to undertake a second postdoctoral fellowship to learn neurobiology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine with Dr. Bruce Krueger.  In 2006, I was named a BIRCWH Scholar by the Maryland’s Organized Research Effort in Women’s Health and was appointed Assistant Professor in the Department of Physiology.  Research in my laboratory is supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Department of Defense.  

Research Interests:

Calcium signaling and gene expression

Lab Techniques and Equipment:

Molecular biology, genetics and biochemistry


Laboratory Personnel:

  • Sean Connolly

Publications:

T.J. Kingsbury and K.W. Cunningham. A conserved family of calcineurin regulators. Genes and Development 14:1595-1604 (2000)

J.J. Fuentes, L. Genesca, T.J. Kingsbury, K.W. Cunningham, M. Perez-Riba, X. Estivill and S. de la Luna. DSCR1, overexpressed in Down syndrome, is an inhibitor of calcineurin-mediated signaling pathways. Human Molecular Genetics 9: 1681-1690 (2000).

T.J Kingsbury, P.D. Murray, L.L. Bambrick and B.K.Krueger. Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of TrkB expression in neurons. Journal of Biological Chemistry 278:40744-8 (2003)

Z. Hilioti, D.A. Gallagher, S.T. Low-Nam, P. Ramaswamy, P. Gajer, T.J. Kingsbury, C.J. Birchwood, A. Levchenko and K.W. Cunningham. GSK-3 kinases enhance calcineurin signaling by phosphorylation of RCNs. Genes and Development 18:35-47 (2004).  PMCID: PMC314273

T.J. Kingsbury and B.K. Krueger. Ca2+, CREB and Kruppel: A novel KLF7-binding element conserved in mouse and human TRKB promoters re¬quired for CREB-dependent transcription. Molecular Cellular Neuroscience, Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience 35:447-455 (2007).  PMCID: PMC2042965

T.J. Kingsbury, L. Bambrick, C. Roby and B.K. Krueger. Calcineurin activity is required for depolarization-induced, CREB-dependent gene transcription in cortical neurons. Journal of Neurochemistry 103:761-770 (2007).

P.D. Murray, T.J. Kingsbury and B.K. Krueger. Failure of Ca2+-activated, CREB-dependent gene transcription in astrocytes. 57:828-834 (2009). PMCID: PMC2669848

L.E.F. Almeida, P.D. Murray, H.R. Zielke, C.D. Roby, T.J. Kingsbury, B.K. Krueger. Autocrine activation of neuronal NMDA receptors by aspartate mediates dopamine- and cAMP-induced CREB-dependent gene transcription. Journal of Neuroscience 29:12702-12710 (2009). PMC2804479

S. Connolly and T.J. Kingsbury. Caffeine modulates CREB-dependent gene expression in developing cortical neurons. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 397: 152-156 (2010). PMC2922856

S. Connolly and T.J. Kingsbury. Regulatory subunit myristoylation antagonizes calcineurin phosphatase activation in yeast. J Biol Chem 287: 39361-39368 (2012). PMCID: PMC3501033

W.C. Cheng, T.J. Kingsbury, S.J. Wheelan and C.I. Civin, A simple high-throughput technology enables gain-of-function screening of human microRNAsBiotechniques. 2013 Feb;54(2):77-86. doi: 10.2144/000113991.

S. Connolly and T.J. Kingsbury. Regulatory subunit myristoylation antagonizes calcineurin phosphatase activation in yeast. J Biol Chem 287: 39361-39368 (2012). PMID: 23027860. PMCID: PMC3501033

W.C. Cheng, T.J. Kingsbury, S.J. Wheelan, C.I. Civin. A simple high-throughput technology enables gain-of-function screening of human microRNAs. BioTechniques 54:77-86 (2013). PMCID: PMC3671589