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Benjamin J Lawner
 

Benjamin J Lawner D.O., EMT-P

Academic Title: Assistant Professor
Primary Appointment: Emergency Medicine
Administrative Title: Ems Assistant Director
Additional Title(s): Deputy EMS Medical Director, Baltimore City Fire Department
blawn001@umaryland.edu
Location: 110 S Paca, 6th Fl., Suite 200
Phone: (410) 328-8025
Fax: (410) 328-8026

Personal History:

Dr. Lawner's first introduction to emergency medicine was in 1994 when he completed a basic emergency medical technician course at Broward Community College in Florida. He subsequently finished paramedic school and worked with Alachua County Fire Rescue in Gainesville, Florida, as a volunteer and career firefighter/paramedic. Dr. Lawner majored in Philosophy at the University of Florida and graduated from Nova Southeastern University's College of Osteopathic Medicine in 2005. He trained in emergency medicine at the University of Maryland Medical System, where he completed a chief residency/faculty development fellowship under the supervision of Dr. Amal Mattu. Dr. Lawner is currently enrolled in an EMS Fellowship jointly sponsored by the University of Maryland School of Medicine, the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems (MIEMSS), and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

Research Interests:

Pre-hospital care and critical care transport, emergency airway management, resident and student education, EMS education

Clinical Speciality:

Emergency Medicine
Pre-hospital Care and Disaster Medicine

Publications:

Alves DA, Lawner B. Should RSI be performed in the pre-hospital setting? Practical Summaries in Acute Care 1(6):45-52, June 2006.

Mattu A, Lawner B. Pre-hospital management of congestive heart failure. Heart Failure Clinics of North America 5(1);19-24, January 2009.

Witting MD, Schenkel SM, Lawner BJ, Euerle BD. Effects of vein width and depth on ultrasound-guided peripheral IV success rates. Journal of Emergency Medicine, March 2009, epub ahead of print.

Lawner BJ, Jump A, Coates ML. Propofol-based procedural sedation and analgesia: beyond current controversies. Practical Summaries in Acute Care 4(10):65-71, September 2009.